Everything You Need To Know About Looking For A New Job In Procurement.

Everything You Need To Know About Looking For A New Job In Procurement.

 

During the Christmas and New Year holidays we worked on several articles with our partners at Spend Matters which were designed to advise those procurement professionals considering a job move in 2015. We covered a range of topics which the active job seeker needs to consider if he or she is going to maximise their chances of find the right role to achieve their career objectives. Topics include how to network and position yourself to get head hunted, working with recruiters, planning your criteria for a move and developing your interview technique.

Here are all the articles in the order they appeared on http://spendmatters.com/uk/

Introduction

The Christmas holidays and early January are traditionally times when people reflect on the previous year and begin to think about a potential job move. Recent research indicates that many people will use their new electronic devices to start looking for a job from Boxing Day onwards.

If this applies to you then our series of articles in association with Spend Matters will be invaluable. We’ll look at what you can do to enhance your chances of finding an exciting career opportunity that is right for you in 2015. We’ll cover key issues like how to plan your job search and criteria for a move. We’ll also advise you on how to use your own network and select which recruiters you will work with.

It’s important to note that a number of factors make January a time when recruitment activity rises. They include the emotional factor of seeing in a new calendar year and contemplating what the future may hold … but in addition there are sound financial reasons why the early part of the year is a busy one for job moves.

Many people receive their annual bonus payments in the first quarter of the year, so this is a factor in terms of when they want to resign from their current position.

Evidence also indicates that many organisations begin to recruit as their business plans and headcount budgets are confirmed early in the calendar year. This fuels a rise in both advertising and recruitment activity in general.

So it’s going to be a competitive market, whether you are hiring the best available talent or trying to find an exciting new role. We hope our advice will help you achieve your goals in 2015.

 

1. Updating Your CV

There are many varying viewpoints on what constitutes a good CV. It is actually very subjective and CV formats vary from sector to sector and across different job functions.

It is often recommended that you should tailor your CV for every role you apply for and whilst this is good advice it can be very time-consuming and not practical if you are in a busy job. An alternative therefore is to think carefully about your key strengths and achievements and create a general document that promotes your best skills and experience. Then you merely need to highlight the skills and experience important for each role rather than a comprehensive review each time.
Focus on the skills, knowledge and competencies that are strengths or those that you enjoy and want to highlight to develop in your next role. The CV is effectively your advert so make it the best you can and use it for all roles. Get feedback from others before you send it out. Make sure that the first page gets across all the key points you wish to highlight – it is true that unless a reviewer finds something interesting on the first page they will rarely read the rest.

Don’t do a long list of responsibilities or just repeat your job description – it is boring and frankly people will assume you are an average candidate. Reviewers look for clarity and relevant experience and the transferable skills you can offer a new employer and want to use/develop in new role.

Yes, describe the roles you undertook but make it brief and make certain you show what problems you solved and how.Companies want to hire people who can change things, improve results, develop teams or improve processes so you need to show you can do this.

Also be careful not to use too much internal jargon. Most organisations have their own structures and terminology but think what people outside may or may not understand. Often a junior HR person may be sifting the CV first – will they know what SRM means for example?

 

2. Networking And Positioning Yourself To Get Approached Or Head-hunted

Most research concurs that the majority of professional jobs are not advertised. So unless you network effectively your job search will take longer and you may miss out on many of the better roles altogether.
Most roles are filled via a number of different networks, whether this is your own personal network or particularly that of recruiters, but it can be via colleagues, old bosses, stakeholders, or even suppliers.

Many people underestimate how many roles are found through social media with LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook all featuring strongly – so if you are not using these then you need to consider them. For professional procurement roles, LinkedIn is the most important.

Recruiters, whether they are in-house or at an agency, widely use these sites as ‘research tools’ to find people with the skills and experience they are looking for. If your profile has little information about what you do, or you don’t make your profile ‘open to view’, then you will not come up in a search so will not get approached.

Your LinkedIn profile is effectively an online networking CV and it needs to reflect your actual CV. Similarly, to create a good profile you need to do the full sales pitch and use many key words relevant to your role or industry, as this is how recruiters search for suitable candidates. Many people use their internal job title, but consider what your job is called most commonly, as this is the term that gets searched for.
You also need to extend your network as the more connections you have the broader your network becomes. However, be discrete as your boss and colleagues will use LinkedIn too, so connecting with ten recruiters at once may raise eyebrows!

Do add ‘recommendations’ on LinkedIn but try to get them from senior people you have worked with – a recommendation from the cleaner (with no disrespect to cleaners) doesn’t look as good as one from a Director (or an old boss).

To bolster your network in a focused way to decide on the kind of role and sector you wish to work in and focus your efforts there – look at the companies in the sector and see if you know people and connect to them. Join groups that are relevant to your role as this also makes you more visible and if you feel confident comment on posts to enhance this or click that you ‘like’ the posts of others, as again this raises your profile and people will notice you.

Talk to recruiters to see what their client base is and what sectors they focus on so that their network compliments your own. Tell them the kinds of organisation you will consider or the values and environment that you prefer.

Most of all remember that this all takes time; finding a job often takes at least 3 to 6 months – so be patient and don’t expect immediate results – connecting or helping someone now may get a pay back years down line. Building a network is an ongoing process and if you don’t respond to ex-colleagues, contacts or recruiters when you aren’t looking, they are less likely to jump to help you when you do decide to move.

 

3. Choosing Which Recruiters To Use

Selecting your recruitment consultancies and which ones can seem like a question without a definitive answer. So let’s take the two constituent parts separately.

Firstly, how many? As many as possible maximises your coverage but that comes with serious caveats. It takes time and effort in establishing contact, briefing the consultant on your career situation, discussing your ideas for your next career move and the relevant financial and geographical parameters. For each additional recruiter you engage with you need to repeat this exercise.

It is also worth keeping in mind that within a specific field of employment, such as procurement, many hiring companies will place their vacancy with several preferred recruiters. If you are registered with a large number of consultants expect to get several calls about the same position which can be frustrating and a waste of your time.

So some middle ground on number of recruitment consultants is appropriate. If you are actively seeking a new position three carefully chosen consultants should give your job search good coverage without excessive time spent briefing consultants or crossover with the same job when it arises.

Secondly, which consultancies? A recommendation from your network of a good recruiter is an ideal start but if you don’t have this luxury then an internet search on recruiters in procurement will give you a long list. Visit each company’s website and check out their credentials. Are they really a specialist in procurement? Do they advertise the sort of jobs that would interest you? Can you see the backgrounds of the individual consultants who would be helping you in your career move?

Trust your instincts here. Good recruiters are knowledgeable about procurement and prepared to give you helpful advice on your worth in the job market. The best listen carefully to what you are looking for and keep those criteria in mind when speaking to you about a position they are working on. Be wary of those that over promise, are scant on detail or always seem to be pushing job opportunities.

 

4. Applying For New Roles

Many companies successfully hire procurement professionals directly. Often this is done via an in-house recruitment team who may approach you in much the same way as a third-party headhunter would. This may happen if they have found your details on a social networking platform or you have applied to the company in the past.

However, if you want to be a bit more proactive you may want to consider some direct approaches to desirable employers. This may be in the tried-and-tested format of simply applying to an advert. The majority of recruitment advertising is now online either on major generalist or industry specialist job boards. In addition, a number of companies advertise their vacancies on their own websites.

It is helpful to add a short covering email to your online application expressing some specific detail about why you are looking for a new position and why the position you are applying for is of interest. It is so much easier to apply for jobs online than by post so employers are often swamped with irrelevant applications. Make sure yours stands out from the masses.

You may have companies that you admire and would be interested in working for. If that is the case you could approach them directly even without an advertised vacancy. Typically you would need to try to identify a senior member of the HR or recruitment team and contact them to explain your interest and what skills and experience you have to offer. This is speculative by nature and so generates a low success rate, however, it may at least create a dialogue which leads to you be considered in the future for suitable jobs.

Often persistence is key when applying for a position directly. If you haven’t received a response to your CV then make contact by email or phone to ask for progress and any feedback. Even if you are not invited for interview you may learn something positive about another opportunity in the company or at least the reason why you weren’t successful.

 

5. Criteria For A Move

It sounds obvious but think carefully about why you want to move. Write down which aspects of your job you are looking to improve on. This helps to take out some of the emotion of the wish list for a new position. It also helps to prepare you to articulate these reasons when asked in an interview situation

Turn any negatives in to a positive as it is important to deliver your requirements in interview in the right manner. For example “I am looking to further develop my negotiation skills” will be much better received than “I don’t get any training where I am.”

With regard to salary package, consider if there any elements of your package which are particularly important to you and consider how likely it is that you are going to get a similar benefit elsewhere. For example, you may benefit from a very generous pension scheme with your current employer.

On the one hand you may be able to negotiate an improved basic salary to compensate for a lower pension contribution. However, there may be a point at which such a negotiation prices you out of the job you want. Put simply, the new company may not be willing to find, let’s say, another 10 percent on the basic salary to compensate for your loss of a generous pension scheme. The message here is work out which aspects of your remuneration package you are willing to be flexible on and by how much.

When assessing your potential new employer make sure they can meet the majority, if not all, of the reasons you are seeking to move. Use common sense as well as what you are being told at interview. If it’s an SME, do they really have the defined long-term career path you are seeking? If they are a global business can they offer you the access to the senior stakeholders you are looking for?

It’s also important to keep you eye on the company news. Just a few minutes online will reveal the financial health and public perception of a company. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t join a firm that has suffered some recent difficulties, just go in with your eyes wide open and be confident that the situation will improve.

In summary, be clear in your own mind about the reasons for moving, be able to articulate those in a positive way at interview and do your due diligence on your potential new employer. In other words check the grass really is greener!

 

6. Interview skills

There are many books that have been written on this subject and it takes practice to become really proficient. However even if you haven’t attended an interview for many years there are a few things you can do to help, but the key thing is being fully prepared.

It is often the case that the best prepared candidates are the ones who are successful at interview rather than those who arrive unprepared thinking that they can ‘wing It’.

If you are nervous remember that the interviewer is probably nervous too – very rarely is someone trying to catch you out – they merely want you to show that you can do the job and solve their problem. They want you to succeed so bear this in mind.

It is impossible to prepare for every possible question, however your preparation should include the following:

  • Doing your homework on the job and the company
  • Research the people you are meeting on LinkedIn
  • From the above think of what you can talk about in the opening ‘meet and greet’
  • Be ready to give detailed examples of your experience and skills (competency-based interviewing)
  • Think about cultural fit and why you want the job
  • If you know somebody in the organisation ask them for hints or tips on the process or the people you will meet

If you don’t know something or haven’t faced a specific situation before it is much better to be honest about it as it is generally obvious when someone doesn’t know as they either start to waffle or quotes best practice rather than giving a specific example.

There are also some typical topics or themes that will be explored in procurement interviews which you can prepare for such as:

  • Relationship & stakeholder management
  • Procurement best practice
  • Role-specific expertise – i.e. leadership, management, strategic sourcing, category management & expertise, etc.

So being prepared and having detailed examples is key.

Also recognise that trained interviewers (often from HR or Resourcing) will be much more formal and less likely to engage in small talk and you need to be prepared for this. They need to ensure they cover the questions and ensure the process is the same for all candidates making this a more formal scenario.

However, no matter how rigorous the process there is still a very strong element of personal chemistry involved in any interview situation. It is true that first impressions count, so do arrive on time, do smile and prepare something to say for the 1st few minutes such as a common connection or a common company or interest.

For more specific career advice tailored to you personally, or to discuss potential please contact one of our Directors:

Andrew Daley – andrew@edburydaley.com
Simon Edbury – simon@edburydaley.com
Peter Brophy – peter@edburydaley.com

Peter Brophy Joins Edbury Daley

We are delighted to announce the addition of Peter Brophy to our senior management team at Edbury Daley.

Peter joins us as an Associate Director and offers an outstanding track record having spent the last five years leading recruitment at procurement outsourcer Proxima.  His in-house recruitment background gives him a uniquely different approach to talent attraction, blending expertise in best practice recruitment techniques and methodologies with a full understanding of the latest practices in talent identification and candidate sourcing.

He has more than eighteen years’ recruitment experience spanning a number of sectors including aerospace engineering, manufacturing, professional services and corporate functions such as HR, finance and procurement. As a result he has an extensive network of contacts and a strong track record in mid to senior level appointments, most recently in procurement.

Peter’s approach to recruitment is a natural fit for Edbury Daley. He focuses on direct and consultative relationships, balancing a sound intellectual grasp of the broader business influences on recruitment needs and decisions with a strong understanding of the core skills and competencies needed, to find the best quality candidates for clients.

Peter is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and has a Master’s degree in Human Resource Management , as well as a degree in Geography.  Outside of work he has two teenage sons, is a long-suffering Newcastle United supporter and is a keen walker.

Q1 2014 Procurement Market Update & Indirect Spend Index

Q1 2014 Procurement Market Update & Indirect Spend Index

We’ve experienced a very positive start to year in terms of the recruitment market conditions for procurement professionals. Last year saw a marked improvement in the number of quality opportunities available in the market, with a particularly strong final quarter, and that increased demand has been sustained in the early months of 2014. Competition for the best procurement people remains fiercest in the middle market, experienced Category Managers in particular, but there is also healthy demand for emerging talent with strong academic backgrounds and a slight increase in the number of leadership roles. These are very encouraging signs for the profession and excellent news for those seeking to move roles in 2014. To view the Q1 indirect spend data and read the rest of our report please download the Procurement Quarterly Market Update Q1 2014

How To Avoid The Ten Most Common Hiring Mistakes

How To Avoid The Ten Most Common Hiring Mistakes

With competition for the best staff increasing in recent months, the value of an effective recruitment strategy will be emphasised in 2014.  Here we look at the ten most common obstacles to attracting the talent required for your business:

1. Understand your internal recruitment processes from the start. A lack of awareness of standard recruitment procedure in your company leads to additional steps and delays. Typically this can be anything from an additional round of interviews or psychometric testing to a medical. Introducing these stages haphazardly part way through the recruitment process is very off putting to potentially strong candidates often leading them to lose interest or accept a job elsewhere. If you aren’t absolutely sure of the procedure speak to HR before you get started and be clear with candidates about the next stage throughout the hiring process.

2. Be realistic about candidates attitudes towards salary when moving jobs. Unless there is a huge improvement in non monetary terms such as a much shorter commute, candidates are looking for an absolute minimum of a 10% increase in basic salary, often more. Your company may well be a desirable employer but you still need to budget for a reasonable salary increase for your chosen candidate.

3. Be precise about the salary budget. A recruiting company states that the basic salary for a particular vacancy will be £50k to £55k and then when the offer is made to the successful candidate it is £50k which, it transpires, was always the absolute maximum. The extra £5k mentioned initially to the candidate could be crucial in creating an incentive for the candidate to be interested. So be clear from the start and therefore ensure that the candidates you see fall within salary budget.

4. Don’t cast the net too wide. Consider the following scenario: you’ve posted your vacancy on your company website and linkedin, you have an advert in a trade journal and on several of the online job boards and you have instructed six recruitment agencies. You have covered all the bases and are expecting some great candidates to interview. However, adverts on or offline have always been an unreliable source of quality candidates so you are probably hoping your recruitment agencies will produce the goods. But each agency knows that there is five other agencies and a slew of advertising to compete against. They are on a no placement no fee model and their chances are slim. So they spend their time working on other assignments where their chances of making a fee are greater and leave you without the quality shortlist you were hoping for. Be more strategic in your selection of recruitment methods and agencies rather than going for the catch all approach.

5. Develop a full understanding of the experience and the other clients of the recruiter working on your behalf. You create a PSL panel of recruiters and agreed terms. The successful companies impressed you with their slick presentation, powerful brand and big office networks. But did you meet the person who will be responsible for selling your senior level vacancies to the best candidates in your industry? Recruitment consultancies are typically high staff turnover businesses and you may have an inexperienced consultant placed on your account. Ask your recruiters which of your direct competitors they work with as this may limit their ability to approach and attract candidates who could be an ideal fit for your needs.

6. Don’t negotiate too hard on recruitment fees. If you have multiple vacancies in your department you can use this leverage to get your chosen recruitment consultancy down to a low percentage of basic salary as a placement fee. You may have got a great deal, but only if the recruiter fills all the vacancies. Remember they are working on a no placement no fee model and almost all of their other assignments will be more lucrative than your work if you have pushed too hard on their fee level. Given your multiple vacancy assignment you would expect to be near the top of their priority list. The fee deal you struck probably means you are a lot lower than you think so strike a balance whereby the terms are attractive for both parties to ensure you get the best results from your recruiter.

7. Don’t make the recruitment process too one sided. You want to make sure you put the shortlist of candidates through their paces and so you set up a half day assessment centre for stage one whereby there is a group interview and some psychometric testing. The problem is that the best candidates are probably only tentatively interested at this stage and unwilling to attend the assessment centre until they know more about the job. Maybe they are not entirely unhappy with their current employer or maybe they have multiple vacancies they are pursuing. Either way, you need to offer a little courtship before sending them to a formal assessment. Set up an initial interview which is as much about you selling the job opportunity and your company as it is assessing the candidate. Only when you have them excited about what you have to offer can you expect them to take half a days holiday and go through rigorous testing.

8. Communicate promptly with candidates following interview. Candidates assume no news is bad news. A delay of more than 48 hours will mean positive momentum will begin to drain away as will the candidates interest in the job. Going back to the strongest candidate quickly maintains the impetus and increases your chances of a job offer being accepted.

But don’t forget the candidates who you are discounting from the process. Dealing with them professionally creates good PR for your company as an employer and you may want to go back to them for a different position at a later date.

9. Take in to account the detail of fringe benefits when making a job offer. Generally both hiring manager and candidate will focus on basic salary when pitching their expectations on package but a failure to dig in to the detail of the benefits package may come back to haunt you. Corporate employment benefits include some or all of the following: car allowance, bonus, private medical insurance, life assurance, pension, discounts, vouchers, share options and signing on bonuses. You might be improving the candidates basic salary with your job offer but lowering their overall package. You need to gather this information early on to understand if you can make them a compelling financial offer.

10. Manage expectations on timing of the offer letter. If you have verbally offered the position and got a verbal acceptance in return you need to sort out the paperwork. Often someone else needs to sign the authority to recruit and may not be immediately available. Then the authority needs to go to HR to put together a benefits pack and then post out the contract and offer. If this is the case make sure you tell the candidate that the offer letter wouldn’t be with them for ten days and stay in touch until they have the contract in their hand.

Q1 2013 Procurement Market Update

Q1 2013 Procurement Market Update

 

Slow Start To The Year?

It has in some ways been a slow start to year in the sense that recruitment processes appear to have slowed in pace in several sectors.  In many cases hiring managers are under such pressure with their day to day work that they find it difficult to make the time to focus on recruitment.  Others are facing delays in having roles signed off or are having to adapt to changing business needs.

That said there have already been a lot of moves in the middle tier of the permanent market (typically £40-£80k in the south east) this year and there is no shortage of demand in the most competitive areas of the market. e.g. indirect spend, see below for more details.

There is also clear evidence that many companies are planning hires for the new financial year and this could spark a flurry of activity in Q2.

 

Indirect Spend

As has been the case since the market began to recover, the competition for best indirect spend expertise remains strong in the corporate world.

Perhaps the best example of this is in Marketing where six blue chip companies within 30 miles of each other were looking for very similar experience at the same time earlier this year.  Some of the roles remain vacant.

The other areas of category expertise in greatest demand at present are:

IT –  Software more so than hardware and to a lesser extent telecoms.

Professional Services – There is still a relatively small pool of potential candidates in this area

HR – There are roles that are recruitment focused along with positions focusing on other areas like mobility, consultancy, compensation & benefits etc.

Travel & Meetings – Very much back on the agenda in the last twelve months with meetings appearing to grow in importance in the current climate. Supply Management recently commented on some research in this area published by the Economist Intelligence Unit and commissioned by American Express

Facilities Management – both soft and hard services.

Given the importance of indirect spend appointments to so many of our clients and the market in general, we have decided to formally measure how demand varies over time in the various indirect spend categories to provide some hard data to support our quarterly commentary.

Starting from January this year we are collating figures from across the private sector covering the number of roles in each of the key indirect spend categories.  We will then track this on a quarterly basis to create The www.edburydaley.com Indirect Spend Recruitment Index.  We will publish our first data in mid April.

 

The Interim Market

Despite the more pragmatic approach to day rates that has existed for at least 12  months now, the interim market remains slow with many quality contractors seeking new assignments.

Again we expect the new financial year to give this market a boost as is often the case with new budgets. This could be particularly marked this year with several consultancies needing interim resource if the projects referred to above are finally approved and experienced consultants are required at particularly short notice.

 

Industry Sectors

We are currently working with clients in FMCG, banking, pharmaceuticals, consultancy, leisure and business services and in each case we are aware of demand for similar skills from our clients competitors. However sector trends remain difficult to define with inconsistencies across each area. A good example is that of the IT Services sector where headcount restrictions exist in a couple of major players whilst some competitors have several open vacancies in procurement,

 

Senior Management

There remains very little movement at the most senior level of the market.  As has been the case for the last two years big moves at CPO level are relatively rare, and leadership roles within smaller functions are still highly sought after by a large pool of highly qualified candidates.

 

Transformation Consultancy & Spend Management Providers

All of our consulting clients are busy with existing projects and bidding for new work, but headcount restrictions are common.  Several of the big multi disciplinary practices and niche procurement specialists have resources stretched to capacity, and with new projects imminent with the start of the new financial year, many are having to plan their recruitment pipelines for the second quarter.

There is growing demand for both senior managers offering business development capability and experienced consultants in specialist Spend Management organisations.  In terms of demand for staff this is demonstrating classic signs of a growing market.

If you wish to discuss any of the points raised in this article please contact Andrew Daley on 0161 300 7978 or via andrew@edburydaley.com